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    School Accountability Report Card    
School Year 2001-2002


School Information

District Information

 School Name

 Ramona Elementary

 District Name

 Hemet Unified

 Principal

  Ms. Patti Froom

 Superintendent

  Dr. Stephen C. Teele

 Street

 41051 Whittier Ave.

 Street

 2350 W. Latham Ave.

 City, State, Zip

 Hemet, CA    92544-6312

 City, State, Zip

 Hemet, CA    92545-3632

 Phone Number

951-765-1670

 Phone Number

  951-765-5100

 FAX Number

 951-765-1677

 FAX Number

  951-765-5115

 Web Site

 

 Web Site

  www.hemetusd.k12.ca.us

 Email Address

  pfroom@hemetusd.k12.ca.us

 Email Address

  Ljoyce@hemetusd.k12.ca.us

 Enrollment

 845

 SARC Contact

  Linda Joyce

 Grades Served

  K-5

   


School Description and Mission Statement

            “Improving Tomorrow Today – No Excuses!” is our motto.  Our balanced, comprehensive, success oriented program addresses all aspects of the elementary school student.  Parents and teachers are partners in providing opportunities for their children/pupils to achieve their personal best.  Students are encouraged to develop a vision of excellence for their future, while learning to accept responsibility for their actions and achievement.

            Students at Ramona School come from a variety of backgrounds, which represent a diverse culture and socio-economic population.  Ramona is one of 20 schools in the Hemet Unified School District with an enrollment of 835 students in grades K-5. 

            Student expectations are well defined and modeled.  Ramona teachers are well versed in state and district academic standards and use these standards to design instruction in order for all students to achieve proficiency.

            The best way to experience Ramona Elementary School is to visit.  The community and parents have a standing invitation to share in the excitement and drama that unfolds every day at our school.  Be a part of the Ramona team.  Come see us!


Opportunities for Parental Involvement

 Contact Person Name

  Ms. Patti Froom

 Contact Person Phone Number

951-765-1670 

 The site addresses the six areas of parent involvement through their comprehensive school plan.  For more information, contact the site principal.

I. Demographic Information

Student Enrollment
The percentage of students is the number of students in a racial/ethnic category divided by the school's most recent California Basic Educational Data System (CBEDS) total enrollment.

 Racial/Ethnic Category

 Number
of Students

 Percentage
of Students

 Racial/Ethnic Category

 Number
of Students

 Percentage
of Students

 African-American

24 

2.8 

 Hispanic or Latino

268 

31.7 

 American Indian or Alaska Native

0.9 

 Pacific Islander

0.2 

 Asian-American

1.1 

 White (Not Hispanic)

533 

63.1 

 Filipino-American

0.1 

 Other

0.0 


II. School Safety and Climate for Learning

School Safety Plan

 Date of Last Review/Update

  September 2001

 Date Last Reviewed with Staff

  September 2001

 The School Site Council reviews and approves a comprehensive safe school plan including data regarding school crime, safe school procedures and compliance with laws including (1) child abuse reporting, (2) disaster response, (3) suspension and expulsion policies, (4) notification of teachers of dangerous pupils, (5) sexual harassment, (6) schoolwide dress codes prohibiting gang-related apparel, (7) procedures for safe ingress and egress from school, (8) procedures to ensure a safe and orderly environment conducive to learning, and (9) rules and procedures on school discipline adopted pursuant to Ed Code Sections 35291 and 35291.5.  A copy of the plan is available for inspection by the public at each school.


School Programs and Practices that Promote a Positive Learning Environment

            Students are enthusiastic about learning, teachers are earnest about teaching, and parents are eager to become involved in school activities.  This sense of empowerment promotes a positive learning environment.  Ongoing achievement celebrations are an integral way in promoting positive attitudes and maintaining high expectations.  These include Student of the Month, Academic Honor Roll, Student Council, Safety Patrol, as well as PTA sponsored recognition programs.

            Ramona School implements a school-wide discipline program.  Recess detention, office intervention, parent-student-teacher conference, placement in buddy classrooms, suspension, and parent escorts of students throughout the school day are possible consequences for negative behavior. 

            Home and school act as partners in addressing concerns and successes.  “Improving Tomorrow Today – No Excuses!” is the motto that symbolizes our partnership between student, parent, and teacher for recognizing one’s potential and developing achievement skills.  Ramona’s school environment encourages the capabilities and emphasizes the worth of individuals.

Suspensions and Expulsions
The number of suspensions and expulsions is the total number of incidents. The rate of suspensions and expulsions is the total number of incidents divided by the school's California Basic Educational Data System (CBEDS) total enrollment for the given year. In unified school districts, a comparison between a particular type of school (elementary, middle, high) and the district average may be misleading. Schools have the option of comparing their data with the district-wide average for the same type of school.

 

 School

 District

 1999

 2000

 2001

 1999

 2000

 2001

 Suspensions (number)

15 

43 

2558 

2804 

3182 

 Suspensions (rate)

.008 

.02 

.05 

24% 

22% 

27% 

 Expulsions (number)

50 

55 

103 

 Expulsions (rate)

.02 

.02 

.03 


School Facilities

 Ramona School currently contains 22 permanent classrooms and 16 relocatable classrooms.  Valley-Wide provides a relocatable for their after-school childcare program.  Recent additions/improvements include modernization of our kitchen facilities, a new lunch shelter, fiber optic for Internet access, and an expanded parking lot. 

            The general condition of our school facilities is adequate considering that we only have 80% of our custodial support.  Classrooms are cleaned daily.

            In addition to teachers who supervise before school, after school and during recess, seven campus supervisors assist with school safety.  Walkie-talkies provide communication among supervision staff and with the office.  We have an intercom system throughout the school.  Student Safety Patrol and student campus beautification efforts assist in maintaining a safe and attractive environment.  An adult crossing guard assists students at the Columbia/Whittier intersection.

            All students participate in regularly scheduled fire and earthquake drills.  Safety screening has been installed on glass windows to prevent implosion and secured hazardous objects.  Parents’ donations allow us to maintain disaster preparedness supplies, food, and equipment on an ongoing basis.


III. Academic Data

Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR)
Through the Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program, students in grades 2-11 are tested annually in various subject areas. Currently, the STAR program includes California Standards Tests (CST) in English Language Arts and Mathematics in grades 2-11, and Science and History-Social Science in grades 9-11; and the Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition (Stanford 9), which tests Reading, Language, Mathematics (grades 2-11), Spelling (grades 2-8), and Science and History-Social Science (grades 9-11 only).

California Standards Tests (CST)
The California Standards Tests show how well students are doing in relation to the state content standards. Student scores are reported as performance levels. The five performance levels are Advanced (exceeds state standards), Proficient (meets standards), Basic (approaching standards), Below Basic (below standards), and Far Below Basic (well below standards). Students scoring at the Proficient of Advanced level have met state standards in that content area.

English Language Arts (ELA)
Percentage of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standard)

 Grade
Level

 School

 District

 State

 1999

 2000

 2001

 1999

 2000

 2001

 1999

 2000

 2001

 2

 --- 

 --- 

 31

 --- 

 --- 

 27

 --- 

 --- 

 32

 3

 --- 

 --- 

 23

 --- 

 --- 

 27

 --- 

 --- 

 30

 4

 --- 

 --- 

 27

 --- 

 --- 

 30

 --- 

 --- 

 33

 5

 --- 

 --- 

 21

 --- 

 --- 

 22

 --- 

 --- 

 28

 6

 --- 

 --- 

 

 --- 

 --- 

 26

 --- 

 --- 

 31

 7

 --- 

 --- 

 

 --- 

 --- 

 26

 --- 

 --- 

 32

 8

 --- 

 --- 

 

 --- 

 --- 

 30

 --- 

 --- 

 32

 9

 --- 

 --- 

 

 --- 

 --- 

 29

 --- 

 --- 

 28

 10

 --- 

 --- 

 

 --- 

 --- 

 30

 --- 

 --- 

 31

 11

 --- 

 --- 

 

 --- 

 --- 

 29

 --- 

 --- 

 29


ELA Subgroups (More than 10 Students Per Grade Level with Test Results)
Percentage of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standard)

 Grade
Level

   Male  

 Female

 English
Learners

 Not-English
Learners

 Socioeconomically
Disadvantaged

 Not
Socioeconomically
Disadvantaged

 Migrant
Education
Services

 2

 30

 30

 0

 35

 28

 35

 

 3

 19

 27

 0

 26

 13

 42

 

 4

 22

 32

 8

 28

 26

 29

 

 5

 24

 18

 0

 21

 11

 35

 


ELA Racial/Ethnic Groups (More than 10 Students Per Grade Level with Test Results)
Percentage of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standard)

       No data is available for this section

Stanford 9
Reading and mathematics results from the Stanford 9 test are reported for each grade level as the percentage of tested students scoring at or above the 50th percentile (the national average). School results are compared to results at the district and state levels.

Reading
Percentage of students scoring at or above the 50th percentile

 Grade
Level

 School

 District

 State

 1999

 2000

 2001

 1999

 2000

 2001

 1999

 2000

 2001

 2

 55

 56

  48

 46

 50

  49

 44

 49

 51

 3

 43

 48

  53

 43

 49

  48

 41

 44

 46

 4

 42

 43

  41

 44

 46

  49

 41

 45

 47

 5

 39

 44

  41

 41

 49

  45

 42

 44

 45

 6

     

 45

 38

  46

 44

 46

 47

 7

     

 45

 47

  43

 44

 46

 48

 8

     

 51

 49

  49

 47

 49

 50

 9

     

 37

 37

  36

 34

 35

 35

 10

     

 33

 37

  34

 33

 34

 34

 11

     

 37

 38

  40

 35

 36

 37


Mathematics
Percentage of students scoring at or above the 50th percentile

 Grade
Level

 School

 District

 State

 1999

 2000

 2001

 1999

 2000

 2001

 1999

 2000

 2001

 2

 67

 60

  55

 58

 61

  61

 49

 57

 58

 3

 32

 59

  58

 48

 68

  65

 48

 56

 59

 4

 36

 49

  53

 47

 51

  59

 44

 51

 54

 5

 43

 39

  46

 45

 51

  55

 45

 50

 54

 6

     

 53

 51

  53

 50

 55

 57

 7

     

 46

 46

  45

 45

 48

 50

 8

     

 46

 52

  49

 45

 48

 49

 9

     

 49

 53

  53

 48

 51

 51

 10

     

 39

 47

  42

 44

 46

 45

 11

     

 43

 48

  41

 45

 47

 46


Stanford 9 Subgroups (More than 10 Students Per Grade Level with Test Results)

Stanford 9 Subgroups - Reading
Percentage of students scoring at or above the 50th percentile

 Grade
Level

   Male  

 Female

 English
Learners

 Not-English
Learners

 Socio-economically
Disadvantaged

 Not
Socio-economically
Disadvantaged

 Migrant
Education
Services

 2

  43

  53

  7

  54

  49

  48

 

 3

  55

  51

  23

  58

  43

  71

 

 4

  36

  47

 

  43

  40

  43

 

 5

  38

  43

 

  42

  26

  62

 


Stanford 9 Subgroups - Mathematics
Percentage of students scoring at or above the 50th percentile

 Grade
Level

   Male  

 Female

 English
Learners

 Not-English
Learners

 Socio-economically
Disadvantaged

 Not
Socio-economically
Disadvantaged

 Migrant
Education
Services

 2

  55

  55

  19

  61

  49

  66

 

 3

  55

  61

  20

  64

  47

  80

 

 4

  51

  55

 

  56

  51

  54

 

 5

  44

  48

 

  48

  35

  62

 


Stanford 9 Racial/Ethnic Groups (More than 10 Students Per Grade Level with Test Results)

Stanford 9 Racial/Ethnic Groups - Reading
Percentage of students scoring at or above the 50th percentile

       No data is available for this section

Stanford 9 Racial/Ethnic Groups - Mathematics
Percentage of students scoring at or above the 50th percentile

       No data is available for this section

 California Fitness Test
Percentage of students meeting fitness standards (scoring in the healthy fitness zone on all six fitness standards)
Note: To protect confidentiality scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.

 Grade
Level

 School

 District

 State

  Total 

 Female

  Male 

  Total 

 Female

  Male 

  Total 

 Female

  Male 

 5

 20.4

 17.7

 22.9

 33.0

 29.2

 36.9

 21.3

 21.9

 20.9

 7

     

 45.9

 47.3

 44.5

 24.9

 25.8

 24.3

 9

     

 29.5

 22.7

 36.1

 22.6

 20.3

 24.9


 SAT I
The SAT I Reasoning Test, formerly known as the Scholastic Assessment Test, is one of the tests available from The College Board that students voluntarily take for college entrance. The SAT I is designed to assess many of the skills that are important to a student's success in college. The test may or may not be available to students at a given school. Students may take the test more than once, but only the highest score is reported at the year of graduation.

       No data is available for this section

Academic Performance Index (API)

The Academic Performance Index (API) is a score on a scale of 200 to 1000 that annually measures the academic performance and progress of individual schools in California. On an interim basis, the state has set 800 as the API score that schools should strive to meet.
Growth Targets: The annual growth target for a school is 5% of the distance between its base API and 800. Actual growth is the number of API points a school gained between its base and growth years. Schools that reach their annual targets are eligible for monetary awards. Schools that do not meet their targets and have a statewide API rank of one to five are eligible to participate in the Immediate Intervention/Underperforming Schools Program (II/USP), which provides resources to schools to improve their academic achievement.
Subgroup APIs and Targets: In addition to a whole-school API, schools also receive API scores for each numerically significant racial/ethnic and socioeconomically disadvantaged subgroup in the school. Growth targets are also set for each of the subgroups. Each subgroup must also meet its target for the school to be identified as having met its target.
Percentage Tested: In order to be eligible for awards, elementary and middle schools must have at least 95% of their students in grades 2-8 tested in STAR. High schools must have at least 90% of their students in grades 9-11 tested.
Statewide Rank: Schools receiving an API score are ranked in ten categories of equal size (deciles) from one (lowest) to ten (highest), according to type of school (elementary, middle, or high school).
Similar Schools Rank: This is a comparison of each school with 100 other schools with similar demographic characteristics. Each set of 100 schools is ranked by API score from one (lowest) to ten (highest) to indicate how well the school performed compared to schools most like it.

API criteria are subject to change as new legislation is enacted into law. More detailed and current information about the API and public school accountability in California can be found at the California Department of Education website at http://api.cde.ca.gov/ or by speaking with the school principal

School Wide API

 

 API Base Data

 

 API Growth Data

 1999

 2000

 2001

 1999

 2000

 2001

 Percentage Tested

  100

 99

 

 Percentage Tested

 99

 100

 

 Base API Score

  615

 658

 

 Growth API Score

 658

 680

 

 Growth Target

  9

 7

 

 Actual Growth

 43

 22

 

 Statewide Rank

  5

 5

 

 Eligible for Awards

 Yes

 Yes

 

 Similar Schools Rank

  6

 5

 

 Eligible for II/USP

     


API Subgroups - Racial/Ethnic Groups

 

 API Base Data

 

 API Growth Data

 1999

 2000

 2001

 1999

 2000

 2001

 African-American

 African-American

 Base API Score

     

 Growth API Score

     

 Growth Target

     

 Actual Growth

     

 American Indian or Alaska Native

 American Indian or Alaska Native

 Base API Score

     

 Growth API Score

     

 Growth Target

     

 Actual Growth

     

 Asian-American

 Asian-American

 Base API Score

     

 Growth API Score

     

 Growth Target

     

 Actual Growth

     

 Filipino-American

 Filipino-American

 Base API Score

     

 Growth API Score

     

 Growth Target

     

 Actual Growth

     

 Hispanic or Latino

 Hispanic or Latino

 Base API Score

  536

 588

 

 Growth API Score

 588

 626

 

 Growth Target

  7

 6

 

 Actual Growth

 52

 38

 

 Pacific Islander

 African-American

 Base API Score

     

 Growth API Score

     

 Growth Target

     

 Actual Growth

     

 White (Not Hispanic)

 White (Not Hispanic)

 Base API Score

  640

 678

 

 Growth API Score

 678

 707

 

 Growth Target

  7

 6

 

 Actual Growth

 38

 29

 


API Subgroups – Socio-economically Disadvantaged

 

 API Base Data

 

 API Growth Data

 1999

 2000

 2001

 1999

 2000

 2001

 Base API Score

  545

 607

 

 Growth API Score

 607

 644

 

 Growth Target

  7

 6

 

 Actual Growth

 62

 37

 


IV. School Completion (Secondary Schools)

California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE)
Beginning with the graduating class of 2004, students in California public schools will have to pass the California High School Exit Exam to receive a high school diploma. The School Accountability Report Card for that year will report the percentage of students completing grade 12 who successfully complete the California High School Exit Exam.

 The instruction in the core curriculum in language arts and math begins in grade 4.


Dropout Rate and Graduation Rate
Data reported regarding progress over the most recent three-year period toward reducing dropout rates includes: grade 9-12 enrollment, the number of dropouts, and the one-year dropout rate listed in the California Basic Educational Data System (CBEDS). The formula for the one-year dropout rate is (Grades 9-12 Dropouts/Grades 9-12 Enrollment) multiplied by 100. Graduation rate data will be reported after the California State Board of Education approves a graduation rate formula.

       No data is available for this section

V. Class Size

Average Class Size and Class Size Distribution
Data reported are the average class size and the number of classrooms for each range of students, by grade level as reported by CBEDS.

 Grade

 1999

 2000

 2001

 Avg

 1-20

 21-32

 33+

 Avg

 1-20

 21-32

 33+

 Avg

 1-20

 21-32

 33+

 K

 17.3

 6

 0

 0

 18.3

 7

 0

 0

 19.0

 6

 0

 0

 1

 19.1

 7

 0

 0

 20.0

 6

 0

 0

 20.1

 6

 1

 0

 2

 18.9

 7

 0

 0

 20.0

 6

 0

 0

 20.0

 6

 0

 0

 3

 29.2

 0

 5

 0

 20.0

 6

 0

 0

 19.9

 7

 0

 0

 4

 31.0

 0

 5

 0

 31.2

 0

 5

 0

 31.8

 0

 4

 0

 5

 29.4

 0

 5

 0

 30.2

 0

 5

 0

 32.6

 0

 2

 3

 6

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 K-3

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 19.0

 1

 0

 0

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 3-4

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 31.0

 0

 1

 0

 4-8

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 Other

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 0.0

 0

 0

 0

 0.0

 0

 0

 0


Class Size Reduction Participation
California's K-3 Class Size Reduction program began in 1996 for children in kindergarten and grades one through three. Funding is provided to participating school districts to decrease the size of K-3 classes to 20 or fewer students per certificated teacher.

 Grade Level

 Percentage of Pupils Participating

 1999

 2000

 2001

 K

 100%

100%

100%

 1

100%

100%

100%

 2

100%

100%

100%

 3

100%

100%

100%


VI. Teacher and Staff Information
Teacher Credential Information
Part-time teachers are counted as '1'. If a teacher works at two schools, he/she is only counted at one school. Data are not available for teachers with a full credential and teaching outside his/her subject area.

 

   1999  

   2000  

   2001  

 Total Number of Teachers
 

 43

 43

 43

 Full Credential
 (fully credentialed and teaching in subject area)

 42

 41

 41

 Teaching Outside Subject Area
 (fully credentialed but teaching outside subject area)

 0

0

0

 Emergency Credential
 (includes District Internship, University Internship, Pre-Interns and Emergency Permits)

 2

 4

 3

 Teachers with Waivers
 (does not have credential and does not qualify for an Emergency Permit)

 0

 0

 0


Teacher Evaluations

 The Principal evaluates teachers at Ramona Elementary School on a regular basis.  The evaluation process is based on the progress of students toward the District’s standards of achievement, instructional techniques and strategies used by the employee; adherence to curricular objectives, and establishment and maintenance of a suitable learning environment.  Tenured teachers are evaluated at least once every two years and probationary (new) teachers are evaluated at least once a year.


Substitute Teachers

 All substitute teachers hold the appropriate California credential as required by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing.  They are required to have a Bachelors Degree and pass the California Basic Skills Test (CBEST).  Due to the shortage of substitute teachers, Hemet Unified School District must constantly recruit qualified substitutes.  Where there is an insufficient number of substitutes available, site administrators and certificated staff members are asked to cover the classes.


Counselors and Other Support Staff
Data reported are in units of full-time equivalents (FTE). One FTE is defined as a staff person who is working 100% full time. Two staff persons working 50% of full time also equals one FTE.


Academic Counselors
Data reported are in units of full-time equivalents (FTE). One FTE is defined as a staff person who is working 100% of full time. Two staff persons working 50% of full time also equals one FTE. The ratio of pupils per academic counselor is enrollment as reported in the most recent California Basic Educational Data System (CBEDS) data collection divided by the number of academic counselors.

 Number of Academic
Counselors (FTE)

 Ratio of Pupils per
Academic Counselor

 0.00

 0.00

 Title

   FTE  

 Counselor

 0.50

 Librarian

 0.00

 Psychologist

 0.50

 Social Worker

 0.00

 Nurse

 0.00

 Speech/Language/Hearing Specialist

 1.00

 Resource Specialist (non-teaching)

 0.00

 Other

 0.00


VII. Curriculum and Instruction

School Instruction and Leadership

 Expectations for quality instruction and student success in behavior and academics are in place at Ramona.  Twice monthly staff meetings are held to discuss and refine curriculum and instructional strategies.  Regular visitations are made to classrooms and formal observations provide support and improvement as the administrator and teacher work as a team to improve instruction.

The Gifted and Talented Program is open to 3rd through 5th grade qualified students who receive an extended and enriched curriculum to meet their needs.  Yearly goals are developed to support district goals and are focused upon by teachers and administrators to insure quality educational programs.


Professional Development

 The school and district provide all teachers with the opportunity for in-service and training in a variety of programs.  Training opportunities are available to teachers throughout the school year focusing on curriculum, state/district standards, and teaching strategies.  High quality staff development is brought to Ramona.

            School administrators receive regular training on skills such as evaluation, change process, interpersonal skills, curriculum standards and instructional practice.  Both site administrators have participated in the California School Leadership Academy.

            Curriculum development at Ramona continues to emphasize reading (literature based and phonics supported), language arts, mathematics, student learning styles, multiple intelligences authentic assessment measures, thematic teaching, cooperative learning, parent involvement, and specific instructional strategies. 

Staff Development Days

1999-00

2 (voluntary)

2000-01

3 (voluntary)

2001-02

3 (voluntary)


Quality and Currency of Textbooks and Other Instructional Materials

            A teacher committee recommends textbooks to the Hemet Unified School District Governing Board through the Superintendent.  The Board considers only those series that the State Adoption Committee has approved.  Included in the textbook adoption process is a review of the state framework and district standards for student achievement, pilot use of the series in the district classrooms, as well as approval of texts by the Curriculum Council and Governing Board.  The district’s goal is that each student have use of a textbook in all core subject areas.

            Ramona School believes technology to be an integral part of the curriculum and to child’s future success.  We offer a computer lab currently housing 20 IBM/CD Rom computers, and two Macintosh with a laser printer.  Classrooms are equipped with between two to four IBM CD/ROM computers for students to use throughout the day.  Seven iMac computers are housed in the library/media center.  Wiring for the Internet is complete to the office and will soon be installed to classrooms.

            Ramona’s library is open to all students and staff.  Individual classrooms visit the library bi-monthly for a minimum of 30 minutes of instruction, reference and research availability and checkout privileges.  A library media technician with the help of parent volunteers coordinates library services.  Presentations are aligned with previously taught classroom lessons.  Our library houses over 10,000 hardback books and 2,200 paperback books with circulation exceeding 52,000.

SUBJECT

TITLE

GRADE

EDITION

ADOPTION DATE

Reading

Scholastic Literacy Place

K-5

1996

May 1997

Mathematics

Saxon Mathematics

K-5

1997

December 1999

Science

Harcourt Brace Calif Edition

K-5

2000

March 2001

Social Studies

Houghton Mifflin Social Studies

K-8

1991

November 1990


Instructional Minutes (School Year 2000-2001)
The California Education Code establishes a required number of minutes per year for each grade. The table below compares the number of instructional minutes offered at the school level to the state requirement for each grade.

 Grade
Level

 Instructional
Minutes
Offered

 State
Requirement

 K

 36,000

 36,000

 1

 52,280

 50,400

 2

 52,280

 50,400

 3

 52,280

 50,400

 4

 54,180

 50,400

 5

 54,180

 50,400

 6

 

 50,400

 7

 

 50,400

 8

 

 50,400

 9

 

 64,800

 10

 

 64,800

 11

 

 64,800

 12

 

 64,800


Total Number of Minimum Days

 Hemet Unified School District offers 180 instructional days per year.  That meets or exceeds the state minimum requirements for instructional minutes.  As reflected in our school calendar, there are scheduled minimum days during the year and the last day school.

Student/Teacher School Days

Student

Certificated


Level


Minimum


Shortened


Regular


Total

Non
Student Day

Contract
Days

K

Gr. 1-5

(Elem.)

Gr. 6-12

(Sec.)

n/a

10

5

n/a

33

n/a

180

137

175

180

180

180

1

1

1

184

184

184


VIII. Postsecondary Preparation (Secondary Schools only)

College Admission Test Preparation Course Program

 Applicable to high schools only.

Degree to Which Students are Prepared to Enter Workforce

 Applicable to high schools only.


IX. Fiscal and Expenditure Data

Average Salaries (Fiscal Year 1999-2000)
Average Salary uses the statewide data category used for comparison by type and size of district (from Management Bulletin 01-02)

 Category

 District Amount

 State Average
For Districts
In Same Category

 Beginning Teacher Salary

 $32,488

 $31,574

 Mid-Range Teacher Salary

 $48,896

 $49,697

 Highest Teacher Salary

 $63,600

 $62,217

 Average Principal Salary

 $77,092

 $81,575

 Superintendent Salary

 $128,499

 $122,833

 Percentage of Budget for Teacher Salaries

 44.1

 44.1

 Percentage of Budget for Administrative Salaries

 4.2

 5.2


 
Expenditures

 District

 District

 State Average
For Districts
In Same Category

 State Average
All Districts

 Total Dollars

 Dollars per Student
(ADA)

 Dollars per Student
(ADA)

 Dollars per Student
(ADA)

 $86,934,158

 $5,452

 $5,758

 $5,705


Types of Services Funded

 Special funds such as School Improvement Program, GATE, and special education provide supplementary funds to improve student achievement and promote quality programs and instruction.  Ramona annually receives approximately $81.02 per pupil (grade K-5) for School Improvement Program (SIP) funds and $644.76 per child for Title 1 funds (276 students).  The lottery allocation for 2000-01 for Ramona ranged in the amount of $377.00 per certificated F.T.E.


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